The “must attend” conferences of 2019.

January 24, 2019 § 3 Comments

Dear Colleagues:

2018 was a great year for many of us. Many of you developed professionally and became better at what you do. I congratulate you for that important achievement; unfortunately, competitors are still out there, languages are still changing, technology continues to improve, and clients (agencies or direct corporations) will pay for what they need but are looking for the best service at the best price.  The question is: How do we adapt to reality, keep up with technology, and improve our service?  The answer is complex and it includes many issues.  Like every January, at the dawn of a new year, the time for planning activities, and programming agendas, we will concentrate on one of them: Professional development.

It is practically impossible to beat the competition, command a high professional fee, and have a satisfied client who does not want to have anything to do with any other interpreter but you, unless you can deliver quality interpreting and state-of-the-art technology.  We need to be better interpreters.  We must study, we must practice our craft, we should have a peer support network (those colleagues you call when in doubt about a term, a client or grammar) and we must attend professional conferences.

I find immense value in professional conferences because you learn from the workshops and presentations, you network with colleagues and friends, and you discover what is happening out in the very competitive world of interpreting.  Fortunately, there are many professional conferences all year long and all over the world.  Fortunately (for many of us) attending a professional conference is tax deductible in our respective countries.  Unfortunately, there are so many attractive conferences and we must choose where to go.   I understand that some of you may attend one conference per year or maybe your policy is to go to conferences offered near your home base. I also know that many of you have professional agendas that may keep you from attending a particular event even if you wanted to be there.  I applaud all organizations and individuals who put together a conference. I salute all presenters and support staff that makes a conference possible, and I wish I could attend them all.

Because this is impossible, I decided to share with all of you the 2019 conferences I am determined to attend. In other years I have attended more conferences than the ones on my list, last-minute changing circumstances and personal commitments let me go to events I had not planned to attend at the beginning of the year. Besides great content and first-class presenters, when I attend a conference, I consider other elements that, in my opinion, are as relevant as content and presenter quality. I do not attend conferences organized by entities (individuals or agencies) who strategically put together great content and top-notch presenters to attract interpreters for the purpose of directly or indirectly recruit them to work for low fees and deplorable work conditions.  I do not go to conferences organized, or partly organized, by individuals or agencies well-known for paying low fees and treating interpreters as medieval serfs or commodities in their so-called “industry”. With one exception (and you can discover the reasons) I do not participate in conferences with side shows such as trade shows and corporate members who directly oppose the interests and well-being of professional interpreters and translators; and you will never find me at events co-sponsored by entities (individuals or agencies) who are attempting to create a favorable image in new markets to enter said markets and lower the standards by imposing their practices in the new countries they intend to profit from. My money will not go to these corporations and individuals, regardless of the show they bring to town. I will not do it.

As of today, the conferences I plan to attend this year are:

The First Africa International Translation Conference in Nairobi, Kenya (February 8-9). I will attend this conference because I want to be part of history and support the tremendous efforts of our often forgotten African colleagues. They have put together a program with excellent presenters, interesting topics, and the potential of networking with so many colleagues that do not go to many events in Europe or the United States. If you are an interpreter, translator, proof-reader, linguist, teacher, or you just love languages and cultures, this is an event you need to attend.

The Institute of Translation and Interpreting (ITI) Conference in Sheffield, U.K. (May 10-11). The ITI conference is the biggest professional conference for interpreters and translators in the United Kingdom. This event does not happen every year, and the two-year wait is worth it. Those who live in the United States should travel to Sheffield and hear presenters who do not travel to the events in the Americas. The conference will have a track dedicated to interpreting issues. You can also enjoy the invaluable experience of learning about the problems our colleagues are facing across the Atlantic, and hopefully learn from the strategy they resorted to solve a problem that could be similar (sometimes identical) to a situation we may be fighting in the United States at this time. I hope to see many of my American and European friends and colleagues at this event.

The National Association of Judiciary Interpreters and Translators (NAJIT) Conference in Nashville, TN (May 17-19). Because of the size of the event, and its content, NAJIT offers the premier conference for judiciary interpreters and translator, in the United States, and I dare to say anywhere. This event covers legal interpreting from all angles: court, out of court, ethics, business, domestic and international, and many others. It also deals with legal translation and transcription topics no other conference covers. The association went through a bumpy ride that in my opinion affected its credibility and ability to represent the common professional interests of the legal interpreter and translator community, but after a successful election, and with a new Board, that is now in the past. I am looking forward to a great conference in one of the most spectacular cities in the United States.

Quinto Encuentro Internacional de Traductores dentro de la Feria Universitaria del Libro (FUL) in Pachuca, Mexico (August 30-31). I have attended this conference from its inception and it is bigger and better every year. This conference centers on a topic every year and 2019 will offer interpreting and translation workshops and presentations related to human rights. I like this event because of the many students from several Mexican States. Most conferences are attended by professional colleagues with years of experience, but this “encuentro” is attended by bus loads of translation, interpreting, and other language-related colleges and universities from the hone-state of Hidalgo and surrounding States. It is also known for its broad coverage of issues rarely covered by other conferences such as indigenous languages, political rights, and others. The conference takes place within the International University Book Fair (FUL) and this gives it a unique atmosphere. If you live in Mexico, I encourage you to attend this event.

American Translators Association ATA 60 Conference in Palm Springs, CA (October 23-26). Every year, the American Translators Association puts the biggest show on earth.  More presentations to choose from, more attendees, and a great chance to see old friends and make new ones. Besides the content of its presentations and workshops, this conference includes other events I am not a fan of under the same roof: they do a trade show and provide a space for many multinational agencies to approach and convince interpreters and translators to work for laughable fees and conditions. These sore spots should not keep professional interpreters from attending the honest academic portions of the event. To take advantage of the conference without being exposed to the many predators that attend every year in agencies, vendors, and “well-intentioned colleagues”, I pick my activities carefully, never losing sight of those in attendance who want to destroy our profession and turn it into an industry of commodities. With that warning, and despite the difficulties to reach Palm Springs for most of our colleagues from around the world, go to Palm Springs and enjoy the conference, vote for Board members who do not put corporate members over individual interpreters and translators, and have a great time with your friends.

XXIII Translation and Interpreting Congress San Jerónimo (FIL/OMT) in Guadalajara, Mexico (November 23-24) Every year the Mexican Translators Association (OMT) puts together a magnificent program featuring well-known presenters from all over the world. Coming from a very successful sold-out XXI Congress, the 2019 edition will have workshops and presentations in varied, useful, and trending topics. This is the activity to attend this year for those colleagues who work with the Spanish language.  Extra added bonus: The Congress is held in the same venue (Expo Guadalajara) and at the same time as the International Book Fair, one of the largest in the Spanish language world. Besides the professional sessions, attendees can also stroll up and down the immense fairgrounds, purchase books, listen to some or the most renowned authors in the world, or just window shop between sessions. Other events may appear from time to time, but this remains, by far, the premier translation and interpreting event in Mexico.

I know the choice is difficult, and some of you may have reservations about professional gatherings like the ones I covered above.  I also know of other very good conferences all over the world, some of the best are local, regional, and national events; others are specialized conferences tailored to a certain field of our profession. I would love to attend many but I cannot. Some of you will probably read this post in a group or website of an association whose conference I will not attend this year, you will probably see me at other conferences not even mentioned here; that is likely. To those I cannot attend this year: I wish you success and productive conferences.  Remember, the world of interpreting is more competitive every day and you will need an edge to beat the competition.  That advantage might be what you learned at one conference, or whom you met while at the convention.  Please kindly share your thoughts and let us know what local, national or international conference or conferences you plan to attend in 2019.

The confusing list of holidays in the United States.

February 15, 2018 § 5 Comments

Dear colleagues:

Many colleagues who live abroad, and others who live in the United States but grew up somewhere else, have asked me about the holidays in the United States.  Many visitors to the U.S. are often confused when they see holidays where everything is closed, holidays where some things are closed, and holidays where everything is closed in one place and open somewhere else. I thought this was a good time to explain our unique holiday schedule because on the third Monday in February, we observe Presidents’ Day, our third federal holiday of the year.  This apparent chaos is really a manifestation of the fifty states’ sovereign powers, and the result of the different history, culture, origins, interests, and values of each one.

The United States is a federation of fifty states and each state has its own legislation and decision-making process.  Because of this system Americans have two types of holidays: Those determined by the United States Congress, and observed in all fifty states, are called federal holidays; and those that have been declared by state and local governments, and are only observed in a specific state, county, or city.  The latter ones are state or local holidays.  By comparison with other countries the United States has very few federal holidays, but the states are a different story.

All federal government offices close on federal holidays but the state and local governments remain open unless the federal holiday is also a state holiday.  Federal government offices continue to work on state holidays, and sometimes, only city or county offices may close for the day in observance of a local holiday to honor a local hero or commemorate an event of great importance at the city level. Unless they are government workers, Americans go to work on many holidays. To the foreign observer, a good rule to remember is that on federal holidays, all federal government offices, banks, and the post office will be closed. On state holidays, all state government offices and public schools will be closed. The rest of the American people will have the day off during major federal holidays, and the citizens of a particular state will not have to work on a local holiday, even if the rest of the country does. It is only on major holidays, which are observed at the state and federal level, that everybody enjoys a day away from the workplace.

On January 1, 1971 Congress passed the “Uniform Monday Holiday Act” which shifted most holidays to a Monday in the month where the original holiday was observed.  The states followed the same system shortly after.  There are 10 federal holidays in the United States:

New Year’s Day. January 1*

Martin Luther King Jr. Day. Third Monday in January

Presidents’ Day. Third Monday in February

Memorial Day. Last Monday in May*

Independence Day. July 4*

Labor Day. First Monday in September*

Columbus Day. Second Monday in October

Veterans Day. November 11

Thanksgiving Day. Fourth Thursday in November*

Christmas Day. December 25*

*Major federal holidays.

All government offices are closed on them all.

Except for Presidents Day and Veterans Day, all 50 states observe the rest of the federal holidays as state holidays. The states that do not observe Presidents Day as a state holiday are:

Delaware

Georgia

Indiana

Iowa

Kansas

Kentucky

Louisiana

North Carolina

Rhode Island

Wisconsin

Some states opted out of this holiday because they honor Washington and Lincoln on a different date.

The only state not to observe Veterans Day is Wisconsin. At the inception of Martin Luther King Jr. Day, some counties in Arizona considered not observing the holiday.

There are many reasons for the states’ holidays, some are historical, like Mississippi’s Robert E. Lee’s Birthday in January, Hawaii’s King Kamehameha Day in June, or Massachusetts’ Patriots Day in April. Other are cultural, like California’s Cesar Chavez Day in May, or Maryland’s American Indian Heritage Day in November. Other holidays have a practical reason to exist, like Indiana’s Primary Election Day in May, and General Election Day in November; some are for convenience like designating the fourth Friday in November as a holiday, under different names, in many states, and some are religious, like Kansas’ Christmas Eve in December, or Delaware’s Good Friday. There are also local holidays observed in a particular city or county, not the rest of the state. To honor Casimir Pulaski (Kazimierz Pulaski), a War of Independence hero born in Poland, the City of Chicago, and Cook County, Illinois, observe Pulaski Day on the first Monday of every March. On that day, Chicago and Cook County government offices are closed, and children leaving in Chicago do not go to school.

Some states have no state holidays. The following States have no State holidays, only federal:

Arizona

Colorado

Florida

Idaho

Oregon

Wyoming

Also keep in mind there are certain “celebrations in the United States” that are treated like holidays even though they are not: Super Bowl Sunday in February, Cinco de Mayo in May, and St. Patrick’s Day in March are not official holidays and everybody works on those dates.

This is the complete list of all state holidays in the United States by state:

Alabama

Mon Jan 15 Robert E. Lee’s Birthday

Tue Feb 13 Mardi Grass Day

Mon Apr 23 Confederate Memorial Day

Mon Jun 4 Jefferson Davis Birthday

Alaska

Mon Mar 26 Seward’s Day

Thu Oct 18 Alaska Day

Arkansas

Mon Jan 15 Robert E. Lee’s Birthday

Mon Feb 19 Daisy Gatson Bates Day

Mon Dec 24 Christmas Eve

California

Sun Feb 4 Rosa Parks Day

Sat Mar 31 Cesar Chavez Day

Fri Nov 23 Thanksgiving Friday

Connecticut

Mon Feb 12 Lincoln’s Birthday

Fri Mar 31 Good Friday

Delaware

*Does not observe Presidents Day

Fri Mar 30 Good Friday

Tue Nov 6 General Election Day

Thu Nov 8 Return Day

Fri Nov 23 Thanksgiving Friday

District of Columbia

Mon Apr 16 DC Emancipation Day

Georgia

*Does not observe Presidents Day

Mon Apr 23 Confederate Memorial Day

Fri Nov 23 Georgia State Holiday

Mon Dec 24 Washington’s Birthday Holiday (Following year on Dec 26)

Hawaii

Mon Mar 26 Prince Jonah Kuhio Kalanianaole Day

Fri Mar 30 Good Friday

Mon June 11 King Kamehameha Day

Fri Aug 17 Statehood Day

Tue Nov 6 General Election Day

Illinois

Mon Feb 12 Lincoln’s Birthday

Tue Nov 6 General Election Day

Fri Nov 23 Thanksgiving Friday

Indiana

*Does not observe Presidents Day

Fri Mar 30 Good Friday

Tue May 8 Primary Election Day

Mon Oct 8 Columbus Day

Tue Nov 6 General Election Day

Fri Nov 23 Lincoln’s Birthday Holiday

Mon Dec 24 Washington’s Birthday Holiday (Following year on Dec 26)

Iowa

*Does not observe Presidents Day

Kansas

*Does not observe Presidents Day

Fri Nov 23 Thanksgiving Friday

Mon Dec 24 Christmas Eve

Kentucky

*Does not observe Presidents Day

Fri Mar 30 Good Friday

Fri Nov 23 Thanksgiving Friday

Mon Dec 24 Christmas Eve

Mon Dec 31 New Year’s Eve

Louisiana

*Does not observe Presidents Day

Tue Feb 13 Mardi Gras Day

Fri Mar 30 Good Friday

Tue Nov 6 General Election Day

Maine

Mon Apr 16 Patriots Day

Mon Oct 8 Columbus Day

Fri Nov 23 Thanksgiving Friday

Maryland

Mon Oct 8 Columbus Day

Tue Nov 6 General Election Day

Fri Nov 23 American Indian Heritage Day

Massachusetts

Mon Apr 16 Patriots Day

Mon Oct 8 Columbus Day

Michigan

Tue Nov 6 General Election Day

Fri Nov 23 Thanksgiving Friday

Mon Dec 24 Christmas Eve

Mon Dec 31 New Year’s Eve

Minnesota

Fri Nov 23 Thanksgiving Friday

Mississippi

Mon Jan 15 Robert E. Lee’s Birthday

Mon Apr 30 Confederate Memorial Day

Fri Nov 23 Thanksgiving Friday

Missouri

Mon Feb 12 Lincoln’s Birthday

Tue May 8 Truman Day

Montana

Mon Oct 8 Columbus Day

Tue Nov 6 General Election Day

Nebraska

Fri Apr 27 Arbor Day

Mon Oct 8 Columbus Day

Fri Nov 23 Thanksgiving Friday

Nevada

Fri Oct 26 Nevada Day

Fri Nov 23 Family Day

New Hampshire

Mon Oct 8 Columbus Day

Fri Nov 23 Thanksgiving Friday

New Jersey

Fri Mar 30 Good Friday

Mon Oct 8 Columbus Day

Tue Nov 6 General Election Day

New Mexico

Mon Oct 8 Columbus Day

Fri Nov 23 Presidents Day Holiday

New York

Mon Feb 12 Lincoln’s Birthday

Mon Oct 8 Columbus Day

Tue Nov 6 General Election Day

North Carolina

*Does not observe Presidents Day

Fri Mar 30 Good Friday

Fri Nov 23 Thanksgiving Friday

Mon Dec 24 Christmas Eve

Wed Dec 26 Christmas Holiday

North Dakota

Fri Mar 30 Good Friday

Ohio

Mon Oct 8 Columbus Day

Sat Dec 1 Rosa Parks Day

Oklahoma

Fri Nov 23 Thanksgiving Friday

Wed Dec 26 Christmas Holiday

Pennsylvania

Mon Oct 8 Columbus Day

Fri Nov 23 Thanksgiving Friday

Rhode Island

*Does not observe Presidents Day

Mon Aug 13 Victory Day

Mon Oct 8 Columbus Day

Tue Nov 6 General Election Day

South Carolina

Thu May 10 Confederate Memorial Day

Fri Nov 23 Thanksgiving Friday

Mon Dec 24 Christmas Eve

Wed Dec 26 Christmas Holiday

South Dakota

Mon Oct 8 Native American Day

Tennessee

Fri Mar 30 Good Friday

Fri Nov 23 Thanksgiving Friday

Wed Dec 26 Christmas Holiday

Texas

Fri Jan 19 Confederate Heroes Day

Fri Mar 2 Texas Independence Day

Fri Mar 30 Good Friday

Sat Mar 31 Cesar Chávez Day

Sat Apr 21 San Jacinto Day

Tue Jun 19 Juneteenth

Mon Aug 27 Lyndon B Johnson Day

Fri Nov 23 Thanksgiving Friday

Mon Dec 24 Christmas Eve

Wed Dec 26 Christmas Holiday

Utah

Tue Jul 24 Pioneer Day

Mon Oct 8 Columbus Day

Vermont

Tue Mar 6 Town Meeting Day

Thu Aug 16 Bennington Battle Day

Virginia

Fri Jan 12 Lee-Jackson Day

Mon Oct 8 Columbus Day

Fri Nov 23 Thanksgiving Friday

WashingtonFri Nov 23 Thanksgiving Friday

West VirginiaWed Jun 20 West Virginia Day

Mon Oct 8 Columbus Day

Fri Nov 23 Thanksgiving Friday

Wisconsin*Does not observe Presidents Day

*Does not observe Veterans Day

Mon Dec 24 Christmas Eve

Mon Dec 31 New Year’s Eve

I hope this brief explanation, and comprehensive holiday list, help you to understand better the holiday calendar of the United States. I now invite you to comment on this subject.

The “must attend” conferences of 2018.

January 8, 2018 § 10 Comments

Dear Colleagues:

2017 was a great year for many of us. Quite a few of you developed professionally and became better at what you do. I congratulate you for that important achievement; unfortunately, competitors are still out there, languages are still changing, technology continues to improve, and clients (agencies or direct corporations) will pay for what they need but are looking for the best service at the best price.  The question is: How do we adapt to reality, keep up with technology, and improve our service?  The answer is complex and it includes many issues that must be addressed.  Like every January, at the dawn of a new year, the time for planning activities, and programming agendas, we will concentrate on one of them: Professional development.

It is practically impossible to beat the competition, command a high professional fee, and have a satisfied client who does not want to have anything to do with any other interpreter but you, unless you can deliver quality interpreting and state-of-the-art technology.  We need to be better interpreters.  We must study, we must practice our craft, we should have a peer support network (those colleagues you call when in doubt about a term, a client or grammar) and we must attend professional conferences.

I find immense value in professional conferences because you learn from the workshops and presentations, you network with colleagues and friends, and you discover what is happening out there in the very competitive world of interpreting.  Fortunately there are many professional conferences all year long and all over the world.  Fortunately (for many of us) attending a professional conference is tax deductible in our respective countries.  Unfortunately there are so many attractive conferences and we must choose where to go.   I understand that some of you may attend one conference per year or maybe your policy is to go to conferences offered near your home base. I also know that many of you have professional agendas that may keep you from attending a particular event even if you wanted to be there.  I applaud all organizations and individuals who put together a conference. I salute all presenters and support staff that makes a conference possible, and I wish I could attend them all.

Because this is impossible, I decided to share with all of you the 2018 conferences I am determined to attend. In other years I have attended more conferences than the ones on my list, last-minute changing circumstances and personal commitments let me go to events I had not planned to attend at the beginning of the year.

As of today, the conferences I plan to attend this year are:

The Association of Translators and Interpreters of Florida (ATIF), ATA Spanish Language Division (SPD) and Florida International University (FIU) “In Miami Spring Into Action” in Miami, Florida, (March 16-18). I will attend this conference because of the program they have put together with top-notched presenters, interesting topics, and the college environment of FIU’s campus.  If you are a Spanish language interpreter, translator, proof-reader, linguist, teacher, or you just love Spanish, this is an event impossible to miss.

Congreso XV Aniversario Asetrad in Zaragoza, Spain, (May 18-20). I always attend Asetrad’s congress because it does not happen every year, which gives me plenty of time to plan ahead since I live in the United States, and because it allows me to listen to some of the best presenters from a country with such rich tradition on interpreting and translating as Spain. Those of us who live in the Americas should take advantage of these events where we get to see and hear presenters who do not travel to the events in the Americas. I also enjoy the invaluable experience of learning about the problems my colleagues are facing across the Atlantic, and hopefully learn from the strategy they resorted to solve a problem that could be similar (sometimes identical) to a situation we may be fighting in the United States at this time. I hope that my Spanish speaking colleagues from the Americas travel to Zaragoza for this exciting event.

The International Association of Professional Translators and Interpreters (IAPTI) Annual Conference in Valencia, Spain (September 29-30).  I go to this conference because it is IAPTI. Because it is about us, the interpreters and translators! This conference, and this organization presents a unique viewpoint of our profession I consider priceless.  It is the only international conference of this size where there are no corporate sponsors. All you see is translators and interpreters like you.  Some results of this innovative approach are that the conference attracts a very important group of colleagues that stay away from other events because they are bothered by the corporate presence.  This is the conference to attend if you want to learn how to deal with agencies, corporate clients and governments, because the absence of all those other players fosters this dialogue.  You can attend the presentations and workshops knowing that no presenter is there to sell you anything and that is fun to have at least once a year.  See you all in Valencia!

American Translators Association ATA 59 Conference in New Orleans, LA (October 24-27). Every year, the American Translators Association puts the biggest show on earth.  More presentations to choose from, more attendees, more opportunities to network, and wonderful NOLA! I enjoy attending ATA conferences because of the variety, organization, and the many friends and colleagues I get to see every year. However, to take advantage of the conference without being exposed to the many predators that attend every year in the form of agencies, vendors, and “well-intentioned colleagues”, I pick my activities very carefully and never losing sight of the obvious presence of those who want to destroy our profession and turn it into an industry of commodities. With that warning, go to New Orleans and enjoy the conference, jazz and cuisine.

XXII Translation and Interpreting Congress San Jerónimo (FIL/OMT) in Guadalajara, Mexico (November 24-25) Every year the Mexican Translators Association (OMT) puts together a magnificent program featuring well-known presenters from all over the world. Coming from a very successful sold-out XXI Congress, the 2018 edition will have workshops and presentations in varied, useful, and trending topics. This is the activity to attend this year for those colleagues who work with the Spanish language.  Extra added bonus: The Congress is held in the same venue (Expo Guadalajara) and at the same time as the International Book Fair, one of the largest in the Spanish language world. Besides the professional sessions, attendees can also stroll up and down the immense fairgrounds, purchase books, listen to some or the most renowned authors in the world, or just window shop between sessions.

I know the choice is difficult, and some of you may have reservations about professional gatherings like the ones I covered above.  I also know of other very good conferences all over the world, some of the best are local, regional, and national events; others are specialized conferences tailored to a certain field of our profession. I would love to attend many but I cannot. Some of you will probably read this post in a group or website of an association whose conference I will not attend this year, you will probably see me at other conferences not even mentioned here; that is likely. To those I cannot attend this year: I wish you success and productive conferences.  Remember, the world of interpreting is more competitive every day and you will need an edge to beat the competition.  That advantage might be what you learned at one conference, or whom you met while at the convention.  Please kindly share your thoughts and let us know what local, national or international conference or conferences you plan to attend in 2018.

Going to the ATA Conference in Chicago? You may want to read this.

October 9, 2014 § 15 Comments

Dear Colleagues:

The ATA Annual Conference is just around the corner, and this year it will be in beautiful Chicago. As many of you know, I live in Chicago and consider it a wonderful place to live and work. Obviously, I was very happy to learn that so many of my interpreter and translator friends and colleagues would be visiting Chicago this year. Finally, I thought, many of you would get to see the city that I brag so much about. It just does not get any better than this: The mother of all conferences and the beautiful town!

Unfortunately, as the dates of the conference were announced, I realized that once again ATA had scheduled the event for November. I never missed an ATA conference as long as they were held in October, but November is not a good month for me; it is a time of many important professional commitments. I tried two years ago in San Diego (the last time I presented in ATA) where I attended the conference for one day and then flew back to the east coast for work-related reasons. Last year I could not make it to San Antonio because of the November dates either. So here we are now, with the biggest conference in our field taking place in my hometown, and with me away from the city for the duration of the event. After this reality sank in, I decided to find a way to make sure that those of you who will be attending the conference could get the best out of our town; in other words: I needed to figure out a way to welcome you to Chicago without being physically there. This is what I came up with. For the next paragraphs I am going to take you through Chicago, I am going to provide you valuable and useful information, and I am going to recommend several places and activities the same way I wanted to do it in person when I first realized that ATA was coming to town. Here it is: from me, to you.

GETTING TO THE SHERATON TOWERS FROM THE AIRPORT.

From O’Hare:

O’Hare is located about 45 minutes away from the hotel.

Arriving on a domestic flight

By Taxi: Go outside the terminal on the same level where you will claim your luggage. There are booths where you can get a taxi (lines may be pretty long depending on the time of the day) A ride to the hotel should be around $55.00 – $60.00 All taxis take credit cards in Chicago.

By Shuttle: Go to the GO Airport Express desk on the same level where you claim your luggage and buy a ticket (round-trip suggested as fare is lower than a one-way ticket) Round trip fare: $54.00 per person. You can pay cash or by credit card, and you can even buy the tickets online from home. The ride to the hotel could take about 90 minutes as these shuttles stop at many hotels. There is no Super Shuttle in Chicago.

By Subway: After you get your luggage, follow the signs to the Blue Line subway terminal inside the airport. Take the blue line to Forest Park and get off at Washington Station (17 stops, about 50 minutes) walk to State Street and either take a taxi (5 minutes to hotel for about $8.00 to $10.00) or take City Bust #29 to Navy Pier and get off at Columbus (about 7-10 minutes) Then walk one block south to the hotel. Subway: $3.50 per person one-way. City bus: $3.25 per person one-way. Subway, L Train, and city buses do not take cash. You will need to purchase a ticket from the machines at the station, or a CTA card for your entire stay at any Walgreens Drug Store. The Blue Line station at O’Hare has machines that take credit cards.

Arriving on an international flight

You will arrive at Terminal 5.

By Taxi: After immigration and customs, Walk outside the terminal and get a taxi from the booth. A ride to the hotel should be around $60.00 – $65.00 All taxis take credit cards in Chicago.

By Shuttle: After immigration and customs, Walk outside the terminal and go to the GO Airport Express booth. You may have to wait for a shuttle for several minutes. If there is no clerk at the booth, dial the phone number on the sign and they will send a shuttle to pick you up. When the booth is unmanned, you can buy the ticked directly from the driver (round-trip suggested as fare is lower than a one-way ticket) Round trip fare: $54.00 per person. You can pay cash or by credit card, and you can even buy the tickets online from home. If you do not want to wait for the shuttle to arrive to Terminal 5, after clearing immigration and customs, you can take the airport train to Terminal 3 (it is free) go to the lower level, and get your tickets at the GO Airport Shuttle desk. (The ride to the hotel could take about 90 minutes as these shuttles stop at many hotels. There is no Super Shuttle in Chicago.

By Subway: After immigration and customs, take the airport train to Terminal 3 (it is free) go to the lower level, and follow the signs to the Blue Line subway terminal inside the airport. Take the blue line to Forest Park and get off at Washington Station (17 stops, about 50 minutes) walk to State Street and either take a taxi (5 minutes to hotel for about $8.00 to $10.00) or take City Bust #29 to Navy Pier and get off at Columbus (about 7-10 minutes) Then walk one block south to the hotel. Subway: $3.50 per person one-way. City bus: $3.25 per person one-way. Subway, L Train, and city buses do not take cash. You will need to purchase a ticket from the machines at the station, or a CTA card for your entire stay at any Walgreens Drug Store. The Blue Line station at O’Hare has machines that take credit cards.

From Midway:

Midway airport is located about 30 minutes away from the hotel.

Ground transportation process is the same for international and domestic flights

By Taxi: Go outside the terminal on the same level where you will claim your luggage. There are booths where you can get a taxi (lines may be pretty long depending on the time of the day) A ride to the hotel should be around $35.00 – $40.00 All taxis take credit cards in Chicago.

By Shuttle: Go to the GO Airport Express desk on the same level where you claim your luggage and buy a ticket (round-trip suggested as fare is lower than a one-way ticket) Round trip fare: $46.00 per person. You can pay cash or by credit card, and you can even buy the tickets online from home. The ride to the hotel could take about 45 minutes as these shuttles stop at many hotels. There is no Super Shuttle in Chicago.

By Subway: After you get your luggage, follow the signs to the Orange Line L train terminal connected to the airport. Take the orange line on the only possible direction and get off at State/Lake Station (13 stops, about 40 minutes) This is an elevated train. You must go down to the street level to State Street and either take a taxi (5 minutes to hotel for about $8.00 to $10.00) or go to the bus stop in front of the Chicago Theatre (about 20 yards) and take City Bust #29 to Navy Pier and get off at Columbus (about 7-10 minutes) Then walk one block south to the hotel. Subway: $3.50 per person one-way. City bus: $3.25 per person one-way. Subway, L Train, and city buses do not take cash. You will need to purchase a ticket from the machines at the station, or a CTA card for your entire stay at any Walgreens Drug Store. The Orange Line station connected to Midway Airport has machines that take credit cards.

Alternate Hotels.

Those who do not wish to stay at the Sheraton Towers can stay at the Embassy Suites one block away (511 N. Columbus Drive) Some single room go for as low as $189.00 and breakfast/happy hour are included. There are many other rooms across the river from the Sheraton (Hyatt, Swissotel, Raddisson, etc., but their prices are equal or higher than those at the Sheraton).

WHERE TO EAT.

It is very difficult to come up with a “best restaurants” list in Chicago because there are so many great options. For this reason, I will share with you some of my favorites, and some of the best options near the Sheraton. Because the idea is for you to experience the local taste, I will leave out all chain restaurants. You can try those back home.

Tony’s best:

I believe there is no better restaurant in the Chicago area (and perhaps anywhere in the world) than 3-Michelin Star Alinea (1725 N. Halsted St. Open Wed-Sun) 18 course tasting menu for 2: $450.00 Reservations a must.

Frontera Grill. PBS’ Rick Bayless’ world famous restaurant (445 N. Clark St.) This place offers the best authentic Mexican food elevated to a higher artistic level. Rick is that famous chef you have watched for years on PBS’ “Mexico, One Plate at a Time”. Dinner for 2: $80.00 Reservations a must.

The Purple Pig. Great “tapas” style restaurant (not Spanish food) with a great wine selection (500 N. Michigan Avenue) Dinner for 2 depends on your appetite. Small dishes are the way to go. Reservations suggested.

Girl & the Goat. Great for sharing small plates. Many options for vegetarians (809 W. Randolph St.) Very popular with the locals. Dinner for 2: $60.00 Reservations suggested.

Tango Sur. A real parrillada argentina (3763 N. Southport Avenue). All meats with all the cuts from Argentina! Great chimichurri, empanadas, and yes, dulce de leche! Restaurant lets you bring your own wine. Dinner for 2: $60.00 Reservations encouraged.

Giordano’s. You have to try the real Chicago-style pizza. There are over 40 locations throughout Chicago, but the closest one to your hotel is within walking distance (730 N. Rush St.) Another option for real Chicago-style pizza is Pizzeria Uno (29 E. Ohio St) I know this is now a chain restaurant, but this is the place where it all started. Dinner for 2: $50.00

Portillo’s. If you are going to try the pizza, then you must try a Chicago-style hot dog. Portillo’s (100 W. Ontario St.) is the place to have the real thing. In case you do not know it, a Chicago dog is served on a poppy seed bun and it is topped with chopped white onions, sweet pickle relish, tomato slices, a dill pickle, sport peppers, celery salt, and mustard. If you value your life don’t ask for ketchup. Dinner for 2: $45.00

Parthenon. One of Chicago’s largest immigrant groups is our Greek community. There is very good Greek food in town, and there are plenty of places to eat. You can go to Greek town and enjoy a delicious meal just about anywhere; with this in mind, I decided to include in this post one of my favorites: Parthenon (314 S. Halsted St.) because of the food, the service and the looks. Dinner for 2: $80.00

GREAT RESTAURANTS WITHIN WALKING DISTANCE FROM THE SHERATON.

Yolk. The hotel has a decent restaurant for breakfast, but if you want to venture into the streets of Streeterville (that is the name of the neighborhood where I live and of your hotel) and positively have the best breakfast in town, walk two blocks to Yolk (355 E. Ohio St.) and enjoy. Because of its popularity, there is some waiting for an available table and they do not take reservations. The wait is outdoors, so I suggest that if you are used to warmer places, bring a jacket or a coat. Breakfast for 2: $40.00

Emilio’s. If you are looking for very good Spanish tapas, there is an excellent place less than 2 blocks from the hotel: Emilio’s (215 E. Ohio St) offers a wide variety of tapas and Spanish wines. This would be a great place for after the session gatherings as well. Dinner for 2: $80.00

Niu. Your hotel is less than one block from my favorite Japanese-fusion restaurant in town. Go to Niu (332 E. Illinois St.) and have some sushi or explore the fusion menu. They also have a good selection of sake. Dinner for 2: $100.00

Volare. If Italian is your thing, then go to Volare (201 E. Grand Ave.) It is about 4 blocks from your hotel and it is the Italian restaurant in this part of town where all locals go; and we go there for the food and service. Dinner for 2: $100.00 Reservations recommended.

Bandera. If your thing is good food, a nice jazz ensemble, and a great view of the Magnificent Mile, then you must dine at Bandera (535 N. Michigan Ave. First Floor) Sometimes I like to go to their very nice bar instead of their dining room. Dinner for 2: $100.00 Reservations recommended.

Sayat Nova. I know Armenian food may not be one of the most popular selections during the conference, but I had to include it because Sayat Nova (157 E. Ohio St.) is less than 4 blocks from your hotel and the food is very good. Dare yourself and try this place that is part of our Streeterville neighborhood character. Dinner for 2: $80.00 Reservations optional.

Ditka’s & Michael Jordan’s. I include this two places because of their owners: Two of Chicago’s icons. At Coach Ditka’s place (100 E. Chestnut St.) you can enjoy some of the best bread in town and perhaps meet the guy. Warning: This is a good 20 minute very enjoyable walk, so you may want to consider a taxi ($10.00) Michael Jordan’s Steakhouse (505 N. Michigan Avenue at the Intercontinental Hotel) is a lot closer than Ditka’s, and it offers some of the best hamburgers in Chicagoland. Both places are very crowded and you will probably wait for a table. Dinner for 2: $80.00

The Food Trucks. Another interesting thing to try for lunch are the food trucks that we have in Chicago. About a block from the hotel, in front of the University of Chicago’s Chicago Booth you can find these trucks Monday-Friday during lunch hours. Lunch: $20.00 (or less) per person.

BARS BY THE HOTEL.

There are many great bars around the Sheraton, even the hotel lobby bar (Chi Bar) offers a good variety of mixed drinks, but I suggest you get out of the hotel, walk right next door by the river side, and have a drink at Lizzie McNeil’s Irish Pub (400 N. McClurg Ct.), walk one block to Lucky Strikes where you can have a drink and do some bowling at the same time (322 E. Illinois St.) or walk 3 blocks to my favorite: Timothy O’Toole’s (622 N. Fairbanks Ct.) where you can catch a game on TV, have a microbrewery beer, and enjoy some good old bar food.

NIGHTLIFE.

Chicago never sleeps and it offers some of the best after hours activities. If you are a night owl I suggest you save some time to go to a blues or jazz establishment. I recommend Blue Chicago (536 N. Clark St.) for great blues every night. For some other cities you may consider that they start late and gets very crowded. There is an admission charge that depends on the band that is playing that night. If you prefer jazz, my favorite spot is the Jazz Showcase (806 S. Plymouth Ct.) it is a traditional place where you will be greeted by the owner. The music is wonderful and the drinks are good at this historic venue. There is an admission charge and a minimum. You will enjoy them both! If you want something more relaxed and early, I suggest the lobby bar of the Millennium Knickerbocker Hotel (163 E. Walton Pl.) where you can enjoy a cocktail while listening to the piano bar music. No cover, no minimum, and very friendly bartenders (drinks are a little expensive). However, if you want to go where tourists go to see Chicago’s skyline from way up there, you need to go to the Signature Room (95th. Floor of the John Hancock Building). You can have a drink while admiring Chicago’s magnificent architecture, or if you prefer, you can have dinner way up there. For dinner: Reservations a must. Dinner for 2: $120.00

There are many places to go dancing in the area. You can look them all up on Yelp.

SIGHTSEEING.

There is so much to see and so little time. This will be the trip that will make you decide to come back as a tourist in the near future. A good way to see some of the main attractions is to get a ticket to the hop on-hop off bus. Tickets can be purchased at the Navy Pier (close to the hotel) and probably at the Sheraton. If you decide to do this, I suggest you sit on the top floor so you can see the tall buildings, and you will definitely need a coat, a hat, and gloves because it will get cold on the top. Chicago is built for walking, so I definitely encourage you to walk the city. Walk the Magnificent Mile and see all the designer shops and boutiques, stop and see the hundreds of fragments from all important buildings in the world that decorate the walls of the Chicago Tribune Building, and take your picture with the Wrigley Building behind you; walk by the beach (yes, we have beaches in Chicago!) and see the waves breaking against the wall barrier, walk by the Navy Pier and see the sailboats (if there are any left by November) walk in the business center (the loop) and admire the architecture while exploring structures like the Sears Tower, (go to the top and walk on the acrylic surface) Union Station (where the first scene of the Untouchables movie was filmed) Picasso’s gigantic sculpture outside City Hall, Chagall’s Four Season’s mural, and the Chicago Mercantile Exchange. I know that the conference will keep you very busy, but a “must” for all visitors is Millennium Park (just across the river from your hotel) Spend some time in the park and take your picture with the iconic “Chicago Bean”. By the way, I know the tower is now Willis, but to us in the city it will always be Sears.

Finally, I just wanted to give you the cultural options we have in case you may want to check them out (and if you have time, you should):

Chicago Art Institute. Recently voted the Best Museum in the World (111 S. Michigan Ave.)

Adler Planetarium (1300 Lake Shore Dr.) Admission: $12.00 per person

Shedd Aquarium (1200 Lake Shore Dr.) Admission: $6.00 per person

Field Museum (1400 S. Lake Shore Dr.) Admission: $18.00

Museum of Science and Industry (5700 S. Laker Shore Dr.) Admission: $18.00

Wrigley Field. Yes, they have tours (1060 W. Addison St.) Addison station on the subway Red Line. Tour tickets: $25.00 per person.

Theater. Only New York City has more theaters than Chicago. Enjoy a musical or a play one of the evenings. For more information, visit: www.broadwayinchicago.com

Sports. Chicago has professional sports teams in all major sports: The Cubs and White Sox in Major League Baseball (MLB), the Fire in Major League Soccer (MLS), the Bulls in the National Basketball Association (NBA), the Blackhawks in the National Hockey League (NHL), the Bears in the National Football League (NFL) and the Sky in the Women’s National Basketball Association (WNBA) There is no baseball season in November and the Bears will be away, but if you want to go to a very exciting professional sport and root for a Chicago team, these are the possibilities:

NBA: Chicago Bulls vs. Cleveland Cavaliers (October 31, 7:00 PM at the United Center)

NHL: Chicago Blackhawks vs. Winnipeg Jets (November 2, 8:00 PM at the United Center)

NBA: Chicago Bulls vs. Orlando Magic (November 4, 7:00 PM at the United Center)

College: Chicago Flames vs. Beloit Buccaneers (November 6, 7:00 PM at UIC Pavilion. College Hockey)

There is an exhibition rugby game between the United States Eagles and the New Zealand All Blacks on November 1, at 3:00 PM at Soldier Field Stadium

For tickets to any of these events, visit: www.findticketsfast.com

I hope you find this information useful and get to know my city a little better. I know the conference is very time-consuming, it is very interesting, and that is really why you are coming to Chicago; however, if you find that you have some free time, if you are coming to town early, or if you are staying for a few days after the conference, try to visit, see, taste, and enjoy some of the great places I have included in this piece. My experience as a conference-goer tells me that there are always situations when you need to talk to some colleagues, and you want to do it away from the rest; it is for those occasions that I have detailed the places to go in this article.

Once again, I am so sorry I will miss all of you in beautiful Chicago, but at least I now feel that I have welcomed you to my kind of town. Please feel free to share with the rest of us any other suggestions about Chicago that you may have.

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